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Posts Tagged ‘steak house’

Just a hop away from the Raleigh-Durham airport is a large red wooden barn that houses one of the most revered institutions in the NC Triangle. The Angus Barn is much more than a mere steak house, and around Christmas time can be seen bedecked in lights, trees, apples, santas, and crowded with local families carefully dressed in their Sunday best for family reunions, dinner with Grandma, and milling about with chummy business associates impressing each other with their largesse. Downright impossible to get a reservation for the main dining area during these times, it’s best to go frightfully early, around 4pm, and set up camp upstairs, past the gun collection, in the no-reservations Wild Turkey Lounge, which has enough presence and Southern charm to satisfy any diner. Actually, due to the popularity of the Wild Turkey Lounge, a satellite area has opened up by the main entrance under some tents, which is open year-round.

This time we went in late April, which has a different, more homey feel to it than the pageantry of Christmas. Thanks to a reservation, my party was able to secure a table in the upstairs dining area, where we were greeted with a basketful of crackers and two small (or too small) crocks of cheddar and blue cheese spreads, and upon request was given a relish tray piled high with cucumber pickles, olives, pickled peppers, and celery. Forget the yummy twice baked herbed potato with cheddar or the huge “side” of Caesar salad and perfectly cooked prime rib with horseradish sauce and juice – one could happily munch on bottomless cheddar spread, homemade pita chips, and pickles all night with a glass of sweet tea. Expect a constant battle of the frustrating confines of ones own stomach, but just keep in mind that the portions (and service) are pure Southern hospitality and each additional course is worth sacrificing the previous course for room.

Don’t worry – the cheese spread and crackers are also available for sale in the country store by the exit.

9401 Glenwood Ave., Raleigh, NC 27617, USA

See my December 2009 review here: https://rachelrecommends.wordpress.com/2009/12/27/angus-barn-a/

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This is a small, simple French bistro serving two prix-fixe menus – the special and the  table d’hote. The special is a simple butter lettuce salad with walnuts, thin steak with mustard sauce, frites; the other menu will give you the same plus a soup and profiteroles for an extra $6.95, though I’ve never had room for all of that. My favourite dessert is the peche melba, which is a tall sundae goblet of buttery vanilla ice cream topped with canned peach halves, whipped cream, and toasted almond slivers. The traditional profiteroles are also good. Diners can look out the windows at passers-by in the bustling downtown area, or can look at themselves in the wall mirrors. We’ve never needed reservations.

2022 Rue Peel at Blvd. de Maisonneuve O.

metro: Peel

See my Sept. 2009 review here.

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Just a hop away from the Raleigh-Durham airport is a large red wooden barn that houses one of the most revered institutions in the NC Triangle. The Angus Barn is much more than a mere steak house, and around Christmas time can be seen bedecked in lights, trees, apples, santas, and crowded with local families carefully dressed in their Sunday best for family reunions, dinner with Grandma, and milling about with chummy business associates impressing each other with their largesse. Downright impossible to get a reservation for the main dining area during these times, it’s best to go frightfully early, around 4pm, and set up camp upstairs, past the gun collection, in the no-reservations Wild Turkey Lounge, which has enough presence and Southern charm to satisfy any diner.

Fortunately, this time around we went in early April, and my party was able to secure a table in the main dining area at 5:30pm, though we had to wait until then for it to open. I was happy to do so, as that meant more time eating the fantastic cheese spread and pickles available upstairs. When we were later seated at our table, we were entertained by a circulating magician so suave I initially couldn’t tell that he was a stranger.

Forget the yummy twice baked herbed potato with cheddar or the huge “side” of Caesar salad – one could happily munch on bottomless cheddar spread, homemade pita chips, and pickles all night with a glass of sweet tea. To my delight, these wonderful delights were readily available at our dining table, too. Ok, then there’d be no juicy, perfect bacon-wrapped sirloin or lush, classic Southern desserts – sawdust or chocolate chess pie, anyone? Expect a constant battle of the frustrating confines of ones own stomach, but just keep in mind that the portions (and service) are pure Southern hospitality and each additional course is worth sacrificing the previous course for room.

9401 Glenwood Ave., Raleigh, NC 27617, USA

See my December 2009 review here: https://rachelrecommends.wordpress.com/2009/12/27/angus-barn-a/

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This is one of the better steak houses in a touristy quarter that has many mediocre steak houses. While the food is tasty and well-presented for a steak house, demerits are taken for slow and haphazard service and noticeably greasy and smudged plates. My husband and a dinner companion noted that the tap water tasted funny, but I did not notice this myself.

I asked the server to replace my bread plate, but didn’t get it until the second bread basket arrived. Our second bread basket was steaming hot, but had probably been microwaved, as it immediately turned chewy when exposed to air. The spinach salad looked great. Portions are what you’d expect from a steak house. My juicy and tender prime rib arrived with tasty fried onions, barely garlicky garlic mashed potatoes, fresh horseradish, and jus. I didn’t quite have room for it, but attempted a very gluey slice of cheesecake, which probably should have been chilled a bit more, topped with cherries in syrup.

metro: Champ de Mars

25, rue Saint-Paul Est and rue Saint Jean Baptiste

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During the tourist season, long lines accumulate outside of the door of this centrally located resto, however, as with many things in Old Montreal, it is best enjoyed outside of tourist season, when half-empty. Then service isn’t slowed to a painful halt and there’s no dull roar of the chattering diners next to you. In the cooler months, too, there’s no table outside by the overflowing public trash can. One can peruse the simple menu on the blackboards at leisure, pretend like it isn’t a tourist trap, and enjoy one of the better steaks in Old Montreal.

The best part of Steak Frites is not the steak, but the hot, bottomless frites which are toted about the resto in heaping stainless steel bowls. The rest of the experience, aside from the soothing dark wooden interior and picturesque exterior, is merely ok – steaks are not bad, but usually contain at least one piece of tendon which has to be dealt. There are other things aside from steak, like the requisite duck confit or salads. The house salad is tossed in some kind of ranch-like dressing which is probably mostly mayonnaise, but at least the bread basket is warm. Profiteroles are slightly tough, but, as with everything else, ok.

Metro: Place d’Armes

12 Rue Saint-Paul Ouest and Blvd. Saint-Laurent.

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Angus Barn; A

Just a hop away from the Raleigh-Durham airport is a large red wooden barn that houses one of the most revered institutions in the NC Triangle. The Angus Barn is much more than a mere steak house, and around Christmas time can be seen bedecked in lights, trees, apples, santas, and crowded with local families carefully dressed in their Sunday best for family reunions, dinner with Grandma, and milling about with chummy business associates impressing each other with their largesse. Downright impossible to get a reservation for the main dining area during these times, it’s best to go frightfully early, around 4pm, and set up camp upstairs, past the gun collection, in the no-reservations Wild Turkey Lounge, which has enough presence and Southern charm to satisfy any diner.

Forget the yummy twice baked herbed potato with cheddar or the huge “side” of Caesar salad – one could happily munch on bottomless cheddar spread, homemade pita chips, and pickles all night with a glass of sweet tea. And maybe a cocktail. Ok, then there’d be no juicy, perfect spare rib or lush, classic Southern desserts – sawdust or chocolate chess pie, anyone? Expect a constant battle of the frustrating confines of ones own stomach, but just keep in mind that the portions (and service) are pure Southern hospitality and each additional course is worth sacrificing the previous course for room.

9401 Glenwood Ave., Raleigh, NC 27617, USA

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